Grahnen has suggested that tooth agenesis is typically transmitted as

Grahnen (1956) has suggested that tooth agenesis is typically transmitted as an autosomal pannexin-1 inhibitor trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Phylogenetic changes in the dentition correlate with functional adaptation. Lavelle et al. (1970) observed that Homo sapiens have developed a tendency towards a shortened maxilla-mandibular skeleton compared to their ancestors. The number of teeth diminishes in parallel with these changes in the jaw skeleton. It has been suggested that one incisor, one canine, one premolar, and two molars per quadrant are likely to be the dental profile of future man. Genetic and pannexin-1 inhibitor molecular genetic causes of agenesis have begun to identify genes important in tooth agenesis. The transcription factor genes MSX1 and PAX9 were the first genes identified for non-syndromic tooth agenesis. Although both genes affect third molars, a significantly higher frequency of agenesis associated with mutations in MSX1 than in PAX9 has been found for second premolars (Vastardis, 2000).

Conclusion

Conflict of interest